Texas Solar PV Growth


Mark Witte
 

Another graph showing the remarkable, projected solar PV growth in Texas. Five years ago, Texas wasn't even near the top three solar energy states. Now, Texas is # 2 and on a growth trajectory to becoming # 1 (to go with the # 1 ranking in installed wind energy generation). 

I'd like to think TXSES, NTREG, etc., deserve some credit for that growth. 

Mark


Paul Westbrook
 

Speaking of wind energy, my wife's family is in Lubbock, so I make a trip out Hwy380/114/82 at least once per year. I attached a snapshot of 2011 vs 2021 wind turbines along this route. 2015 saw the first big building boom. And there is another construction boom right now of turbines that don't even appear on the attached database. (data from https://eerscmap.usgs.gov/uswtdb/viewer/#6/32.697/-99.721).

We just returned from Lubbock yesterday and I noticed a few unusual things. Several of the 2015 wind farms were down - the entire farm, not just a few turbines. I don't know if they are undergoing electrical maintenance, but there were blocks of 30+ turbines all just locked down - near Jacksboro and Olney. On many of the 2015 turbines near Olney there was distinct discoloration along the top third of the tower sections - as if turbine oil/grease/coolant had been leaking and coating the tops of the poles. Right next to them there were brand new shiny 3-4MW turbines going up - not even commissioned and started up yet. I was surprised at how many were out of service along the entire drive.

I haven't seen any big solar farms out that direction, but of course they would be a lot less visible unless they were adjacent to the highway.

Paul


Kevin Janak <kevjan43@...>
 

Interesting and thanks for sharing! My family is originally from West Texas (Big Spring) and we all know that the wind always blows in West Texas! I think that West Texas wind (and solar) could satisfy a majority of Texas energy needs, except on the coastline, which could easily be powered with tidal power, IMO. 

Kevin Janak 
   


GLEN D Suhren
 

Very interesting

 

Glen

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: main@NTREG.groups.io <main@NTREG.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Westbrook <pwestbrook@...>
Sent: Monday, June 28, 2021 8:42:52 AM
To: main@NTREG.groups.io <main@NTREG.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [NTREG] Texas Solar PV Growth

 

Speaking of wind energy, my wife's family is in Lubbock, so I make a trip out Hwy380/114/82 at least once per year. I attached a snapshot of 2011 vs 2021 wind turbines along this route. 2015 saw the first big building boom. And there is another construction boom right now of turbines that don't even appear on the attached database. (data from https://eerscmap.usgs.gov/uswtdb/viewer/#6/32.697/-99.721).

We just returned from Lubbock yesterday and I noticed a few unusual things. Several of the 2015 wind farms were down - the entire farm, not just a few turbines. I don't know if they are undergoing electrical maintenance, but there were blocks of 30+ turbines all just locked down - near Jacksboro and Olney. On many of the 2015 turbines near Olney there was distinct discoloration along the top third of the tower sections - as if turbine oil/grease/coolant had been leaking and coating the tops of the poles. Right next to them there were brand new shiny 3-4MW turbines going up - not even commissioned and started up yet. I was surprised at how many were out of service along the entire drive.

I haven't seen any big solar farms out that direction, but of course they would be a lot less visible unless they were adjacent to the highway.

Paul


Jim Duncan
 

Actually the massive growth of solar PV in Texas and pretty much the world is from utility adoption of low cost solar. Texas experienced the same surge in wind installation after 2008 thanks to the Investment Tax Credit and/orthe Production Tax Credit. The coal & NG industries might hate it but the PTC has put Texas wind at the top in all 50 states. Residential & industrial installations are still barely on the charts.

Jim Duncan
Solar Acres Farm
817.917.0527
solarguy2004@...
On 6/27/2021 5:45 PM, Mark Witte wrote:

Another graph showing the remarkable, projected solar PV growth in Texas. Five years ago, Texas wasn't even near the top three solar energy states. Now, Texas is # 2 and on a growth trajectory to becoming # 1 (to go with the # 1 ranking in installed wind energy generation). 

I'd like to think TXSES, NTREG, etc., deserve some credit for that growth. 

Mark


Philip Timmons
 

Texas (Gulf of Mexico) does not really have much a tide anywhere along the coast?  Have camped on the beach south of Corpus more than few times, and it maybe comes up a couple of feet?

On the other hand, there is some SERIOUS off-shore Wind.  



On Monday, June 28, 2021, 09:51:18 AM CDT, Kevin Janak <kevjan43@...> wrote:


Interesting and thanks for sharing! My family is originally from West Texas (Big Spring) and we all know that the wind always blows in West Texas! I think that West Texas wind (and solar) could satisfy a majority of Texas energy needs, except on the coastline, which could easily be powered with tidal power, IMO. 

Kevin Janak 
   


Kevin Janak <kevjan43@...>
 

I should have been more specific by referencing wave power in my description of tidal power. You are correct there's not enough tidal difference along the Texas coastline to make it viable. There's also an abundance of wind power along the coastline as well.  

Kevin Janak 


David Geise
 

Offshore wind could supply 166% of Texas electricity needs: https://environmenttexas.org/news/txe/new-report-shows-texas-has-huge-offshore-wind-potential.

David Geise

“Adults keep saying: ‘We owe it to the young people to give them hope.’ But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel everyday. And then I want you to act as if your house is on fire. Because it is.”  
– Greta Thunberg

“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.” 
- Carl Sagan

“We are like tenant farmers chopping down the fence around our house for fuel when we should be using Nature's inexhaustible sources of energy — sun, wind and tide. ... I'd put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that. “ 
- Thomas Edison

“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little” - Franklin D. Roosevelt


On Thu, Jul 1, 2021 at 8:52 AM Kevin Janak <kevjan43@...> wrote:
I should have been more specific by referencing wave power in my description of tidal power. You are correct there's not enough tidal difference along the Texas coastline to make it viable. There's also an abundance of wind power along the coastline as well.  

Kevin Janak