Date   

The Most Optimistic Climate Chat You'll Hear This Year

Philip Timmons
 



Topic:  The Most Optimistic Climate Chat You'll Hear This Year

Description:  Renowned and recognized for his decades of climate activism and leadership, Bill McKibben is just back from the COP26 global climate summit in Glasgow -- so he's got pressing questions for Saul Griffith, the author of the new book Electrify! An Optimist's Playbook for Our Clean Energy Future. Kirkus Reviews calls the book "surprisingly optimistic, realistic, and persuasive," and Nature says the book "demands attention." Hear why Saul's optimistic, he'll cheer up Bill, and how Saul's nonprofit Rewiring America is working to make electrification a priority for Congress right now.

Time:  Nov 17, 2021 05:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)



Re: The all-electric future (NPR Marketplace Nov 15)

Molly
 

Bill,
Thanks for the details and webcam link. Wishing you the best on construction, etc.. I look forward to seeing it when it's complete.
Molly

On Tuesday, November 16, 2021, 3:42:51 PM CST, Bill Byrom via groups.io <bill@...> wrote:


Molly, the house is in Irving and nearly under construction, as we are still preparing to start the foundation. I demolished my old house on August 10 - it had problems - and I’m living across the street in a rental house. You can follow the new house construction project visually on my webcam at:

That webcam is aimed north from the rental house at my construction site. It’s one block south of Hwy 183, about halfway between the center of DFW Airport and Love Field. The vehicles past the trees on the left side of the image are on MacArthur Blvd, a major north/south thoroughfare which starts around I-30 in Grand Prairie and runs though Irving, the Los Colinas and Valley Ranch Irving development areas, Coppell, and ends at Round Grove Road in Lewisville. The Baylor Scott & White hospital in Irving is across the street at the left of the cam image.

The project is going slow now. The only thing going on so far this week was the soil testing drilling truck visit around noon today to take two soil core samples. Over the past 5 weeks (due to rain delays) there have been two rounds of soil stabilization chemical injections. The first round failed to meet the engineering requirements, so the equipment had to be brought back in for a second round. We needed a string of several dry sunny days so it wasn’t muddy. 

In addition to supply chain issues, the construction industry locally is very busy right now. I started the house design process in February 2020, and I’m sure it won’t be completed in two years by February 2022. Demand is high on building materials, appliances, and labor. 

Bill


On Tue, Nov 16, 2021, at 8:35 AM, Molly wrote:

Bill, 
Your new house sounds great and like one we need to have on the DFW Solar Tour!  In what city is it located?
Thanks,
Molly Rooke

On Monday, November 15, 2021, 07:40:40 PM CST, Bill Byrom via groups.io <bill@...> wrote:


I just listened to this on the radio (KERA-FM locally) and you can listen online at:
Choose the Nov 15, 2021, episode. The piece about our all-electric future (with a real example in New Orleans) runs from 4:00 - 9:30.

The future sounds similar to the new house I'm building. I'm working with Michael Fladmark and Dan Lepinski on the solar panels, grid-tied inverter with off-grid capability, and a LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery. I'm installing a GSHP (Ground Source Heat Pump) as described in the Marketplace episode. I wish they had also discussed energy efficient appliances (Energy Star and beyond) and energy efficient building techniques. Of course, there will be EV chargers in the garage.

I also need to eventually move to a full EV. Currently I own a 2020 Ford Fusion Energi 4-door PHEV with about 20-25 miles round-trip range (usually sufficient for my daily trips as a retired person) and of course it's also a hybrid vehicle with great gas mileage. But it has a tiny trunk, suitable for my backpack or one suitcase with not too much else, due to the HV batteries beneath and behind the rear seats. I also own a conventional ICE vehicle (2016 Dodge Caravan) which I purchased for a very good price from my employer when I retired and is good for moving big stuff. What I will be looking for in a few years is a medium sized SUV full EV with better range than most current EV models, which Ford (and GM) are moving toward this decade.
 


Re: Fw: November Letter to the Editor Opportunity9

Jay Squyres
 

Mark,

I am in time-critical transportation and tell my dispatchers I want ALL power Grid deliveries.  Engineers are only TOO HAPPY to speak their minds.  I visit Solar, Wind, Coal, Natural Gas, & Nuclear plants.  Every single one of them hates ERCOT.

I think the problem is elsewhere (ERCOT.)  I am only speaking from what I am told from the people working at these plants.

It is amazing, the largest Bambi killers (driving late at nite, avoiding deer,) is going to our Nuke plant.  It is literally Bambi Pinball.

My opinion from what I see/hear.  And Yes.  I am a hard-core Solar & Wind advocate.


PS.  Amazon & UPS are 2 of my best customer's. UPS has 12 planes that land at DFW nightly, 3 are from China.
Amazon has 16, 21 by February, all Domestic arriving at Alliance for us Prime members.  All busy during the day till you gotta replace a Jet Engine - like this one.

 SUPPORT AMERICAN!



Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G.


-------- Original message --------
From: Mark Witte <witte.m@...>
Date: 11/16/21 7:10 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: NTREG Main Group <main@ntreg.groups.io>
Subject: [NTREG] Fw: November Letter to the Editor Opportunity

All,

I'm forwarding an email from Solar United Neighbors, for anyone who might want to write a letter to the editor in support of solar energy.  

I also wanted to discuss the general topic in the email of increasing Texas electricity rates. Considering the ever decreasing costs for solar and wind, shouldn't electricity from renewable generators / providers be decreasing? I understand those companies can make higher profits if they raise their rates like the fossil fuel companies. But it seems they are missing a golden opportunity to grab more market share and demonstrate to existing and prospective customers that renewably generated electricity really is the only way to be protected against rate increases. 

Short term profits over long term strategy isn't smart. 

Mark 


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Lisa Trope <ltrope@...>
To: "sun-tx-lte@..." <sun-tx-lte@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2021, 04:54:47 PM CST
Subject: November Letter to the Editor Opportunity

Hello everyone,

We hope you are having a nice fall! We wanted to share this month's opportunity to write a Letter to the Editor in support of solar energy. Please let us know if you draft and submit a letter! Below is an opinion piece published in The Dallas Morning News, “I looked at the latest electricity prices in Texas and got a shock.  "You can also find the text pasted below my signature. 

Below are a few “talking points” you could consider including in your letter to the editor. Please be sure to write the letter in your own words. 

  • February’s deadly freeze—and today’s soaring energy bills—show Texas is too dependent on unreliable gas plants. Instead, Texas should drive the energy transition by doubling down on our clean energy leadership.

  • Texas renewable energy can support resiliency and reliability.

Submission instructions


Here is the link to where you can submit your letter to The Dallas Morning News.

The letter must be under 200 words to be considered for publication. 

If you’re able to send in a letter in the next two days, great! Let us know. If not, no worries. There will be another opportunity to write soon.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or concerns or if you want us to review your letter before submitting.  Thanks for making helping promote a clean, just, and equitable energy future in Texas with rooftop solar as the cornerstone!

Best, 

Lisa 

--

Lisa Trope
Engagement Specialist
Solar United Neighbors

 

 

Have you looked at retail electricity prices lately?

On the suggestion of readers, I pulled up the state-sponsored marketing site — PowerToChoose.org (beware of imitators) — and it was like I stuck my finger in a wall socket. I was shocked.

For as long as The Watchdog can remember, the opening pages usually highlighted kilowatt hour rates of around 6 to 9 cents.

Now the opening pages show double-digit pricing of 10 cents or more.

Prices of the two dominant players in the market — TXU Energy and Reliant Energy — offer an added jolt.

TXU shows one-year plans for 1,000 kWh around 12 cents. Another listed plan offers a 15.9 cents rate.

On the TXU website, I saw different plans that varied from those presented on the state website. A reminder that with all companies, always remember to check both PowerToChoose and that company’s website.

Reliant shows plans on the state site from 13.4 cents to 15.2 cents for various kWh usage.

This chart by TexasElectricityRatings.com shows the cost of electricity in Texas from 2016 to Oct. 2021. It shows the average rate for 12-month electricity plans, which is what many customers choose.

This chart by TexasElectricityRatings.com shows the cost of electricity in Texas from 2016 to Oct. 2021. It shows the average rate for 12-month electricity plans, which is what many customers choose.(TexasElectricityRatings.com)

Oncor rate spikes

Another charge, the so-called Oncor charge for transmission to retail companies, jumped 19% in September. That means the mandatory fee for each kWh used grew from about 3.5 cents to 4.15 cents. That’s the first time I can remember the Oncor charge crashing the 4 cents a kWh barrier.

To compute your bill, if you use 1,000 kWh a month, multiply 1,000 times 4.15 cents. Then multiply 1,000 kWh by the retail rate you contracted to pay. Add the two together for total kWh fee. And don’t forget to add Oncor’s $3.42 monthly base charge on all bills on top of that.

Oncor tells The Watchdog the 19% increase, approved by the Public Utility Commission, is to help cover the cost of added equipment to handle North Texas’ growth.

Thanks to readers Jerome Giambalvo of Coppell, Doug Archer of Dallas and Phil Caron of Fort Worth for alerting The Watchdog about this.

Why such high prices?

What do Texas experts say about these price jumps?

Ed Hirs, an energy fellow at the University of Houston, says the banning of Griddy, which sold power at wholesale prices, removed a major incentive for retailers to keep their prices down to compete.

He says the increase in natural gas prices we’re seeing is another cause because many Texas power plants run on gas. He blames hurricanes which struck the Gulf of Mexico.

He also blames the Texas government’s bailout allowing companies to recoup billions of lost dollars during the horrific February freezeout through the purchase of $6.5 billion in bonds. Those costs will be passed on to consumers.

When the Texas Legislature sided with companies over consumers, he said, “You know the game is fixed.”

Beth Garza, who served until 2019 as the independent monitor of grid operator ERCOT, said companies selling one-year contracts must anticipate higher prices expected to increase during the length of those contracts.

James Boyle, who once led Texas’ Office of Public Utility Counsel, said: “We all know that what happened in the legislative session is that everybody was taken care of except the home folks. And the consumer pays for everybody else’s mistakes. I think that’s reflected in those prices.”

Kelso King, who runs King Energy Consulting and monitors all Public Utility Commission meetings, warns that still to come is the pass-through to consumers of the multi-billion-dollar bailout for energy companies. That was the solution approved by lawmakers and Gov. Greg Abbott.

King added, “For decades, policymakers kept saying that the great thing about a competitive market was that all of the risks would be borne by generators instead of ratepayers. But when it came down to it, unsurprisingly, end use customers were left holding the bag.”

Buy electricity in Texas

Here are some shopping tips from citizens of my Watchdog Nation.

Judy Ruby-Brown of Coppell was skeptical of Texas Power Switch, which works through cities, mostly, to buy electricity in bulk discount. When I assured her it’s a solid program, she ran the numbers, comparing other companies to it, and declared it the “real deal.” She still predicts she’ll spend $300 more on electricity than she did last year.

Nancy Upson of Dallas discovered one of the dirty secrets: If you buy a 1,000 kWh plan and your usage is above or below that exact amount each month, your rate skyrockets. She says consumers must strive to hit the mark, even if it is wasteful. This applies to 500 kWh and 2,000 kWh plans, too.

Dick Bunting of Bonham discovered that some companies that appear at the top of PowerToChoose.org with supposed low rates charge a $14.99 setup fee.

“Wonder how many folks have been fooled by this,” he asks.

Pam King of Houston says to be wary of outside consultants. Check their reviews and also electricity company reviews, too. Watch out for bait and switch, she says.

A retail company may try to sell you a different plan than the one you want. She says, “They’ll tell you it’s cheaper or has some sort of perk. One company tried to sell me a plan with an air conditioning maintenance contract included.”

She filed a complaint with the PUC on her current provider for charging the wrong transmission fee.

“I’m not the crazy one,” she concluded. “It’s the whole dysfunctional system.”

Amen.




Learn how it's possible for 1 in 4 Americans to go solar!

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NBC 5 Investigates the Texas Electric Crisis

Skip Cave
 

Powerless: NBC 5 Investigates the Texas Electric Crisis

In “Powerless,” NBC 5 Investigates reveals the causes of Texas’ massive February 2021 power crisis that led to 150 deaths and caused more than $100 billion in damage.




Skip Cave
Cave Consulting LLC


Fw: November Letter to the Editor Opportunity

Mark Witte
 

All,

I'm forwarding an email from Solar United Neighbors, for anyone who might want to write a letter to the editor in support of solar energy.  

I also wanted to discuss the general topic in the email of increasing Texas electricity rates. Considering the ever decreasing costs for solar and wind, shouldn't electricity from renewable generators / providers be decreasing? I understand those companies can make higher profits if they raise their rates like the fossil fuel companies. But it seems they are missing a golden opportunity to grab more market share and demonstrate to existing and prospective customers that renewably generated electricity really is the only way to be protected against rate increases. 

Short term profits over long term strategy isn't smart. 

Mark 


----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Lisa Trope <ltrope@...>
To: "sun-tx-lte@..." <sun-tx-lte@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2021, 04:54:47 PM CST
Subject: November Letter to the Editor Opportunity

Hello everyone,

We hope you are having a nice fall! We wanted to share this month's opportunity to write a Letter to the Editor in support of solar energy. Please let us know if you draft and submit a letter! Below is an opinion piece published in The Dallas Morning News, “I looked at the latest electricity prices in Texas and got a shock.  "You can also find the text pasted below my signature. 

Below are a few “talking points” you could consider including in your letter to the editor. Please be sure to write the letter in your own words. 

  • February’s deadly freeze—and today’s soaring energy bills—show Texas is too dependent on unreliable gas plants. Instead, Texas should drive the energy transition by doubling down on our clean energy leadership.

  • Texas renewable energy can support resiliency and reliability.

Submission instructions


Here is the link to where you can submit your letter to The Dallas Morning News.

The letter must be under 200 words to be considered for publication. 

If you’re able to send in a letter in the next two days, great! Let us know. If not, no worries. There will be another opportunity to write soon.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or concerns or if you want us to review your letter before submitting.  Thanks for making helping promote a clean, just, and equitable energy future in Texas with rooftop solar as the cornerstone!

Best, 

Lisa 

--

Lisa Trope
Engagement Specialist
Solar United Neighbors

 

 

Have you looked at retail electricity prices lately?

On the suggestion of readers, I pulled up the state-sponsored marketing site — PowerToChoose.org (beware of imitators) — and it was like I stuck my finger in a wall socket. I was shocked.

For as long as The Watchdog can remember, the opening pages usually highlighted kilowatt hour rates of around 6 to 9 cents.

Now the opening pages show double-digit pricing of 10 cents or more.

Prices of the two dominant players in the market — TXU Energy and Reliant Energy — offer an added jolt.

TXU shows one-year plans for 1,000 kWh around 12 cents. Another listed plan offers a 15.9 cents rate.

On the TXU website, I saw different plans that varied from those presented on the state website. A reminder that with all companies, always remember to check both PowerToChoose and that company’s website.

Reliant shows plans on the state site from 13.4 cents to 15.2 cents for various kWh usage.

This chart by TexasElectricityRatings.com shows the cost of electricity in Texas from 2016 to Oct. 2021. It shows the average rate for 12-month electricity plans, which is what many customers choose.

This chart by TexasElectricityRatings.com shows the cost of electricity in Texas from 2016 to Oct. 2021. It shows the average rate for 12-month electricity plans, which is what many customers choose.(TexasElectricityRatings.com)

Oncor rate spikes

Another charge, the so-called Oncor charge for transmission to retail companies, jumped 19% in September. That means the mandatory fee for each kWh used grew from about 3.5 cents to 4.15 cents. That’s the first time I can remember the Oncor charge crashing the 4 cents a kWh barrier.

To compute your bill, if you use 1,000 kWh a month, multiply 1,000 times 4.15 cents. Then multiply 1,000 kWh by the retail rate you contracted to pay. Add the two together for total kWh fee. And don’t forget to add Oncor’s $3.42 monthly base charge on all bills on top of that.

Oncor tells The Watchdog the 19% increase, approved by the Public Utility Commission, is to help cover the cost of added equipment to handle North Texas’ growth.

Thanks to readers Jerome Giambalvo of Coppell, Doug Archer of Dallas and Phil Caron of Fort Worth for alerting The Watchdog about this.

Why such high prices?

What do Texas experts say about these price jumps?

Ed Hirs, an energy fellow at the University of Houston, says the banning of Griddy, which sold power at wholesale prices, removed a major incentive for retailers to keep their prices down to compete.

He says the increase in natural gas prices we’re seeing is another cause because many Texas power plants run on gas. He blames hurricanes which struck the Gulf of Mexico.

He also blames the Texas government’s bailout allowing companies to recoup billions of lost dollars during the horrific February freezeout through the purchase of $6.5 billion in bonds. Those costs will be passed on to consumers.

When the Texas Legislature sided with companies over consumers, he said, “You know the game is fixed.”

Beth Garza, who served until 2019 as the independent monitor of grid operator ERCOT, said companies selling one-year contracts must anticipate higher prices expected to increase during the length of those contracts.

James Boyle, who once led Texas’ Office of Public Utility Counsel, said: “We all know that what happened in the legislative session is that everybody was taken care of except the home folks. And the consumer pays for everybody else’s mistakes. I think that’s reflected in those prices.”

Kelso King, who runs King Energy Consulting and monitors all Public Utility Commission meetings, warns that still to come is the pass-through to consumers of the multi-billion-dollar bailout for energy companies. That was the solution approved by lawmakers and Gov. Greg Abbott.

King added, “For decades, policymakers kept saying that the great thing about a competitive market was that all of the risks would be borne by generators instead of ratepayers. But when it came down to it, unsurprisingly, end use customers were left holding the bag.”

Buy electricity in Texas

Here are some shopping tips from citizens of my Watchdog Nation.

Judy Ruby-Brown of Coppell was skeptical of Texas Power Switch, which works through cities, mostly, to buy electricity in bulk discount. When I assured her it’s a solid program, she ran the numbers, comparing other companies to it, and declared it the “real deal.” She still predicts she’ll spend $300 more on electricity than she did last year.

Nancy Upson of Dallas discovered one of the dirty secrets: If you buy a 1,000 kWh plan and your usage is above or below that exact amount each month, your rate skyrockets. She says consumers must strive to hit the mark, even if it is wasteful. This applies to 500 kWh and 2,000 kWh plans, too.

Dick Bunting of Bonham discovered that some companies that appear at the top of PowerToChoose.org with supposed low rates charge a $14.99 setup fee.

“Wonder how many folks have been fooled by this,” he asks.

Pam King of Houston says to be wary of outside consultants. Check their reviews and also electricity company reviews, too. Watch out for bait and switch, she says.

A retail company may try to sell you a different plan than the one you want. She says, “They’ll tell you it’s cheaper or has some sort of perk. One company tried to sell me a plan with an air conditioning maintenance contract included.”

She filed a complaint with the PUC on her current provider for charging the wrong transmission fee.

“I’m not the crazy one,” she concluded. “It’s the whole dysfunctional system.”

Amen.




Learn how it's possible for 1 in 4 Americans to go solar!

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "SUN Texas LTEs" group.
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For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


Re: The all-electric future (NPR Marketplace Nov 15)

 

Molly, the house is in Irving and nearly under construction, as we are still preparing to start the foundation. I demolished my old house on August 10 - it had problems - and I’m living across the street in a rental house. You can follow the new house construction project visually on my webcam at:

That webcam is aimed north from the rental house at my construction site. It’s one block south of Hwy 183, about halfway between the center of DFW Airport and Love Field. The vehicles past the trees on the left side of the image are on MacArthur Blvd, a major north/south thoroughfare which starts around I-30 in Grand Prairie and runs though Irving, the Los Colinas and Valley Ranch Irving development areas, Coppell, and ends at Round Grove Road in Lewisville. The Baylor Scott & White hospital in Irving is across the street at the left of the cam image.

The project is going slow now. The only thing going on so far this week was the soil testing drilling truck visit around noon today to take two soil core samples. Over the past 5 weeks (due to rain delays) there have been two rounds of soil stabilization chemical injections. The first round failed to meet the engineering requirements, so the equipment had to be brought back in for a second round. We needed a string of several dry sunny days so it wasn’t muddy. 

In addition to supply chain issues, the construction industry locally is very busy right now. I started the house design process in February 2020, and I’m sure it won’t be completed in two years by February 2022. Demand is high on building materials, appliances, and labor. 

Bill


On Tue, Nov 16, 2021, at 8:35 AM, Molly wrote:

Bill, 
Your new house sounds great and like one we need to have on the DFW Solar Tour!  In what city is it located?
Thanks,
Molly Rooke

On Monday, November 15, 2021, 07:40:40 PM CST, Bill Byrom via groups.io <bill@...> wrote:


I just listened to this on the radio (KERA-FM locally) and you can listen online at:
Choose the Nov 15, 2021, episode. The piece about our all-electric future (with a real example in New Orleans) runs from 4:00 - 9:30.

The future sounds similar to the new house I'm building. I'm working with Michael Fladmark and Dan Lepinski on the solar panels, grid-tied inverter with off-grid capability, and a LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery. I'm installing a GSHP (Ground Source Heat Pump) as described in the Marketplace episode. I wish they had also discussed energy efficient appliances (Energy Star and beyond) and energy efficient building techniques. Of course, there will be EV chargers in the garage.

I also need to eventually move to a full EV. Currently I own a 2020 Ford Fusion Energi 4-door PHEV with about 20-25 miles round-trip range (usually sufficient for my daily trips as a retired person) and of course it's also a hybrid vehicle with great gas mileage. But it has a tiny trunk, suitable for my backpack or one suitcase with not too much else, due to the HV batteries beneath and behind the rear seats. I also own a conventional ICE vehicle (2016 Dodge Caravan) which I purchased for a very good price from my employer when I retired and is good for moving big stuff. What I will be looking for in a few years is a medium sized SUV full EV with better range than most current EV models, which Ford (and GM) are moving toward this decade.
 


Sol Ark

Philip Timmons
 

Any one use or install and Sol Ark equipment, yet?

I have inherited an on-going project with some Sol-Ark in it.  Not getting much competent information from the docs or contact folks.

Any one know how to actually do business with them?   Would really like for them to work and turn out well -- they are local and seem to have some robust (at least in concept) equipment.

THANKS!

Phil Timmons
817-689-7573
philiptimmons@...


Re: The all-electric future (NPR Marketplace Nov 15)

Molly
 

Bill, 
Your new house sounds great and like one we need to have on the DFW Solar Tour!  In what city is it located?
Thanks,
Molly Rooke

On Monday, November 15, 2021, 07:40:40 PM CST, Bill Byrom via groups.io <bill@...> wrote:


I just listened to this on the radio (KERA-FM locally) and you can listen online at:
https://www.marketplace.org/shows/marketplace/
Choose the Nov 15, 2021, episode. The piece about our all-electric future (with a real example in New Orleans) runs from 4:00 - 9:30.

The future sounds similar to the new house I'm building. I'm working with Michael Fladmark and Dan Lepinski on the solar panels, grid-tied inverter with off-grid capability, and a LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery. I'm installing a GSHP (Ground Source Heat Pump) as described in the Marketplace episode. I wish they had also discussed energy efficient appliances (Energy Star and beyond) and energy efficient building techniques. Of course, there will be EV chargers in the garage.

I also need to eventually move to a full EV. Currently I own a 2020 Ford Fusion Energi 4-door PHEV with about 20-25 miles round-trip range (usually sufficient for my daily trips as a retired person) and of course it's also a hybrid vehicle with great gas mileage. But it has a tiny trunk, suitable for my backpack or one suitcase with not too much else, due to the HV batteries beneath and behind the rear seats. I also own a conventional ICE vehicle (2016 Dodge Caravan) which I purchased for a very good price from my employer when I retired and is good for moving big stuff. What I will be looking for in a few years is a medium sized SUV full EV with better range than most current EV models, which Ford (and GM) are moving toward this decade.
 


Re: The all-electric future (NPR Marketplace Nov 15)

Mellen West
 

I heard it too.  Share with others who may not be so informed. I posted on Nextdoor.

M

 

From: main@NTREG.groups.io <main@NTREG.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Byrom via groups.io
Sent: Monday, 15 November, 2021 7:41 PM
To: main@NTREG.groups.io
Subject: [NTREG] The all-electric future (NPR Marketplace Nov 15)

 

I just listened to this on the radio (KERA-FM locally) and you can listen online at:
https://www.marketplace.org/shows/marketplace/
Choose the Nov 15, 2021, episode. The piece about our all-electric future (with a real example in New Orleans) runs from 4:00 - 9:30.

The future sounds similar to the new house I'm building. I'm working with Michael Fladmark and Dan Lepinski on the solar panels, grid-tied inverter with off-grid capability, and a LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery. I'm installing a GSHP (Ground Source Heat Pump) as described in the Marketplace episode. I wish they had also discussed energy efficient appliances (Energy Star and beyond) and energy efficient building techniques. Of course, there will be EV chargers in the garage.

I also need to eventually move to a full EV. Currently I own a 2020 Ford Fusion Energi 4-door PHEV with about 20-25 miles round-trip range (usually sufficient for my daily trips as a retired person) and of course it's also a hybrid vehicle with great gas mileage. But it has a tiny trunk, suitable for my backpack or one suitcase with not too much else, due to the HV batteries beneath and behind the rear seats. I also own a conventional ICE vehicle (2016 Dodge Caravan) which I purchased for a very good price from my employer when I retired and is good for moving big stuff. What I will be looking for in a few years is a medium sized SUV full EV with better range than most current EV models, which Ford (and GM) are moving toward this decade.

 


The all-electric future (NPR Marketplace Nov 15)

 

I just listened to this on the radio (KERA-FM locally) and you can listen online at:
https://www.marketplace.org/shows/marketplace/
Choose the Nov 15, 2021, episode. The piece about our all-electric future (with a real example in New Orleans) runs from 4:00 - 9:30.

The future sounds similar to the new house I'm building. I'm working with Michael Fladmark and Dan Lepinski on the solar panels, grid-tied inverter with off-grid capability, and a LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery. I'm installing a GSHP (Ground Source Heat Pump) as described in the Marketplace episode. I wish they had also discussed energy efficient appliances (Energy Star and beyond) and energy efficient building techniques. Of course, there will be EV chargers in the garage.

I also need to eventually move to a full EV. Currently I own a 2020 Ford Fusion Energi 4-door PHEV with about 20-25 miles round-trip range (usually sufficient for my daily trips as a retired person) and of course it's also a hybrid vehicle with great gas mileage. But it has a tiny trunk, suitable for my backpack or one suitcase with not too much else, due to the HV batteries beneath and behind the rear seats. I also own a conventional ICE vehicle (2016 Dodge Caravan) which I purchased for a very good price from my employer when I retired and is good for moving big stuff. What I will be looking for in a few years is a medium sized SUV full EV with better range than most current EV models, which Ford (and GM) are moving toward this decade.
 


job opportunity - TxETRA 1/2 Position Available in DFW Area for regional Electric Transportation Compact in Dallas/Fort Worth

Molly
 

Please, forward to those who may be interested in and qualified for this job, or apply yourself if it's a good fit for your skills and background. 

Based on my experience and efforts to get local transportation managers interested in moving beyond the fossil fueled status quo, the person who is most likely to be successful will have a positive, can-do attitude, friendly persistence, and be well-informed on the many EV opportunities and benefits, etc.. 

See forwarded email from Laura Morrison of TxETRA, below, and instead of attaching the job description PDF, I've included a link to it here

I look forward to having this regional Electric Transportation Compact in Dallas/Fort Worth to help coordinate, grow and move forward critical, urgent and transformative change from dirty fossil fueled transportation to clean, electric transportation. 

Thanks,
Molly Rooke

TxETRA has received funding to replicate our Austin/San Antonio regional  "Electric Transportation Compact" project in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, and we are looking for someone to work with us in implementing/managing that effort.

If you have ideas of possible candidates or could pass it on to those who might, I'd appreciate it.

The project aims to pull together governmental entities, large employers, universities and ISDs, utilities etc to focus on decreasing transportation-related emissions. This involves electrifying fleets, workplace charging and employee access and adoption of EVs for commuters, telecommuting, and other mobility alternatives.

I've attached a job description. This is a half time position and ideally the candidate would be connected in the DFW area.

Thank you for your help in getting word out, and please let me know if you have ideas of candidates I might reach out to.

Thanks!
Laura
--

Laura Morrison
Executive Director
Texas Electric Transportation Resources Alliance (TxETRA) Education Fund
(512) 608-5546
--

Laura Morrison


$1 billion renewable energy project planned for Central Texas

David Geise
 

Chem-Energy, a California-based firm, plans to hire a minimum of 400 people in the first year as it begins a solar power project in Caldwell County.
 
Check out this story on statesman.com:
https://www.statesman.com/story/business/2021/11/11/chem-energy-california-renewable-energy-project-caldwell-county-power-plants/6385229001/

David Geise

“Adults keep saying: ‘We owe it to the young people to give them hope.’ But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel everyday. And then I want you to act as if your house is on fire. Because it is.”  
– Greta Thunberg

“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.” 
- Carl Sagan

“We are like tenant farmers chopping down the fence around our house for fuel when we should be using Nature's inexhaustible sources of energy — sun, wind and tide. ... I'd put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that. “ 
- Thomas Edison

“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little” - Franklin D. Roosevelt


Mining and Concrete Industries Central to New Massive Energy Storage

Skip Cave
 

The new need for massive amounts of delayed electricity will provide major new business for the mining and cement industries while helping them to clean up their act and generate new earning streams. This is because today's solutions are inadequate for the emerging need in cost, storage time, and performance at larger size.

Raghu Das CEO of analyst firm IDTechEx advises, "Consequently, compressed air is being bid for up to 6GWh at a time of delayed electricity, some using caverns from salt mining. Hydrostor, with a 65GWh negotiation pipeline, mines its own purpose-built caverns. Hydrogen storage in bedded salt deposits is proposed by others. Highview Power sells liquid air versions, with a 4GWh order book. Backer Sumitomo Heavy Industries is known for its excavators and ash handling plants. Highview storage of up to four weeks is ideal for the not-unusual one month of no wind. SaltX proposes nanocoated limestone storage. Expect the mining industry to further buy into these new earning streams from its assets."

Energy Vault in the lead for the gravity option

Gravity storage lifting rocks can even provide six-month seasonal storage (solar not being strong in winter) with no self-leakage of power but proponents currently prioritize up to four weeks in open-pit mines and mineshafts. Energy Vault is leading with an initial target of 2-4 hours storage scaling later to 12 hours economically, at very high efficiency, storing electricity for one-tenth of the cost with batteries and for longer, they say. Composite blocks used in its testing of a 5MW version were 96% soil that was blended with a Cemex polymer developed to enable soil and water to be mixed with cement powder. Tailings from coal mining and fly ash are also of use. Coal plants generate millions of tons of coal combustion residuals. These cause pollution when in landfill so use them for delayed electricity. Gravitricity plans concrete pistons in mine shafts for maximum power delivery, where this is the priority.

Extraction and generation companies invest

Saudi Aramco, the world's largest energy company due to its fossil fuels, and Enel Green Power, the world's largest independent power producer, have invested in Energy Vault. Some of its larger initial deployments are going to be in the Middle East as it transitions from using ample oil to using ample sun. Sand, gravel, other aggregates and rocks, even processing, burning, and concrete waste are involved in various projects. Hot rock storage can prevent the total writeoff of fossil-fuelled power stations at mines, concrete plants, and elsewhere. Replace the generators with green storage keeping the steam turbines and distribution, then sell energy storage to the grid as Siemens Gamesa and Stiesdal are demonstrating.

Appraisal and forecasts

Expensively, lithium-ion batteries are being installed at up to single GWh levels but their response is slower, storage time short due to self-leakage, toxic disposal troublesome. Clean alternatives promise one-tenth of that levelized cost of electricity storage and no materials shortages or toxicity. Will it happen?

IDTechEx has market reports on all the options, for example, "Redox Flow Batteries 2021-2031" which sees them newly competitive for around six hours of storage, and "Stationary Energy Storage Without Batteries: Grid, Microgrid, UPS, Trackside 2021-2041".

Fundamentals

What is behind all this? Electrification is central to saving the planet and eliminating local pollution that kills millions. Today that means very intermittent wind and solar power as hydropower runs out of sites and ecological credentials.

Inadequate long-term storage is a common theme. In recent months, widespread blackouts in China have been partly due to renewables being unable to compensate for the retirement of fossil fuel generation and its increased cost. UK electricity prices have rocketed partly due to a lack of wind. In winter, solar buildings in Europe make one-quarter of the amount of energy storage and cannot compensate. Affordable long-term storage will be the final nail in the coffin of diesel, oil, and gas peaker plants.

Solar power is coming down fastest in cost. However, its intermittency is worst, bringing an additional need which is seasonal storage due to it being feeble in winter not just dead at night. There are many storage options and more on the way and they must tackle this and the fact that storing a given amount of electricity costs at least ten times as much as making it with zero emissions.

Mining and concrete industries are very involved

The mining and concrete industries are intimately involved and all will help each other as this evolves. See the IDTechEx reports, "Concrete and Cement Reinvented: Growing the Market, Decarbonising 2022-2042" and "Mining Electrification: Vehicles, Generation, Repurposing 2022-2042". The largest amount of concrete used on one site is the hydro dam and tidal barrages use huge amounts of concrete. Many bring ecological problems and safety concerns. The number of sites is limited, this also being true of pumped hydro storage but lost concrete business can be replaced by reinvented concrete value chains from quarry to construction.

The cement and concrete industry are together responsible for 6-10% of global warming, mainly due to the calcification in making cement but extraction, crushing, heavy transport and erection also loom big. It is slowly learning to reduce or electrify much of this.
<<<>>>

Skip Cave


Nov 13 Meeting Reminder (Tomorrow morning!)

Dan - NTREG Advisor
 

NTREG's Next Meeting
Date: Saturday, November 13, 2021
Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 noon
Location: ON LINE. Click HERE to Join our November 13 meeting.
Direct Address:https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82190314083?pwd=TjRMR1pDUXArdmJtSVZZeUxGVExxZz09
 
Meeting ID: 821 9031 4083     Passcode: 459652
 
One tap mobile:
   +13462487799,,82190314083#,,,,*459652# US (Houston)
   +16699006833,,82190314083#,,,,*459652# US (San Jose)
 
Dial by your location:
   +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
Meeting ID: 848 6762 5691   Passcode: 459652
 
One tap mobile: +13462487799,,84867625691#,,,,*751752# US (Houston)
 
Dial by your location:
   +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
   +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
 
Presentation: "Dallas College Journey to Sustainability.".
Presenter: Georgeann Moss, Senior Director, Sustainability, Dallas College
 
About Our Presentation:
Georgeann is the Senior Director of Sustainability for Dallas College.  She is the founding director of the Sustainability area, which was created in November, 2017.  However, she has led DCCCD's sustainability program as a volunteer since 2007 when she co-founded DCCCD's Sustainability Team.
 
Under Georgeann's sustainability leadership, Dallas College has transitioned to renewable energy, undertaken its first ever Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education ("AASHE") Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) report and is working to develop its first ever college-wide Resilience and Climate Action Plan.  Her primary goal is for students to graduate from Dallas College with a “Sustainable Solutions” mindset.  When solving any challenge in their lives, she encourages them to ask these three questions:

Is the solution:
  • Good for people?
  • Good for the planet?
  • Good for our prosperity?
If the answer to any of those questions is "No", then they know they need to continue working until they can answer every one of them with a resounding "Yes!"

NTREG meetings are free and open to the public!  Everyone welcome!
 
For more information about our November 13 meeting and other upcoming activities, visit our website and hover your cursor over "Calendar" at the top of the main page.  A drop-down box will appear.  Click on "Near-Term Events" or other subjects of interest.


Re: Plug for solar in Dallas Morning News today

Mark Witte
 

Richard,

Thank you for responding to a fossil fuel troll. I think I've previously seen letters from Robert P. Smith in the paper. It never ceases to amaze me that someone who is so utterly and consistently wrong, so frequently tries to publicly prove it.  My guess is he has a financial interest in fossil fuels. But he still comes across as a complete idiot. 

Mark

On Thursday, November 11, 2021, 06:49:09 PM CST, richjern via groups.io <richjern@...> wrote:


I got a letter to the editor published in the Dallas Morning News this morning. Every bit helps.


Solar makes a difference

 

Re: “Renewables aren’t dependable,” by Robert P. Smith, Nov. 1 Letters.

Smith writes that “Wind and solar are costly, undependable and add nothing to the capacity of the grid.” I have 30 solar panels on my roof and generate two-thirds of my electricity. Hot water and cooking are fueled by propane (a tiny part of my overall energy usage). This equates to half my power coming from the sun. If every Texas business and residence adopted solar, there would easily be a 50% reduction in fossil fuel usage. That ain’t “nothing.”

Richard Jernigan, McKinney


Plug for solar in Dallas Morning News today

richjern@...
 

I got a letter to the editor published in the Dallas Morning News this morning. Every bit helps.


Solar makes a difference

 

Re: “Renewables aren’t dependable,” by Robert P. Smith, Nov. 1 Letters.

Smith writes that “Wind and solar are costly, undependable and add nothing to the capacity of the grid.” I have 30 solar panels on my roof and generate two-thirds of my electricity. Hot water and cooking are fueled by propane (a tiny part of my overall energy usage). This equates to half my power coming from the sun. If every Texas business and residence adopted solar, there would easily be a 50% reduction in fossil fuel usage. That ain’t “nothing.”

Richard Jernigan, McKinney


Green Mountain Energy sustainability grants

 

See:
https://www.greenmountainenergy.com/sun-club/apply/

Rules:
  1. Applicants must be nonprofit organizations with programs benefiting communities where Green Mountain Energy Company does business, which includes specific ZIP codes in the following states:
    • Texas
    • New York
    • Pennsylvania
    • Illinois
    • New Jersey
    • Maryland
    • Massachusetts
  2. The Sun Club® does not provide funding for:
    • For-profit entities
    • Political organizations
    • Religious organizations
  3. Organizations must hold three years of current tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)(3), (4), (6) or (19) of the Internal Revenue Code. Applicants will be expected to provide three years of 990s, along with a W-9 to verify nonprofit status.
  4. Nonprofits should have the following financial history:
    • $250K in annual revenue per year for the past three years
    • $100K raised through public support
 


"architect aesthetic bar joist"

Philip Timmons
 



November 13 Meeting Reminder

Dan - NTREG Advisor
 

NTREG's Next Meeting
Date: Saturday, November 13, 2021
Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 noon
Location: ON LINE. Click HERE to Join our November 13 meeting.
Direct Address:https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82190314083?pwd=TjRMR1pDUXArdmJtSVZZeUxGVExxZz09
 
Meeting ID: 821 9031 4083     Passcode: 459652
 
One tap mobile:
   +13462487799,,82190314083#,,,,*459652# US (Houston)
   +16699006833,,82190314083#,,,,*459652# US (San Jose)
 
Dial by your location:
   +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
Meeting ID: 848 6762 5691   Passcode: 459652
 
One tap mobile: +13462487799,,84867625691#,,,,*751752# US (Houston)
 
Dial by your location:
   +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
   +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
 
Presentation: "Dallas College Journey to Sustainability.".
Presenter: Georgeann Moss, Senior Director, Sustainability, Dallas College
 
About Our Presentation:
Georgeann is the Senior Director of Sustainability for Dallas College.  She is the founding director of the Sustainability area, which was created in November, 2017.  However, she has led DCCCD's sustainability program as a volunteer since 2007 when she co-founded DCCCD's Sustainability Team.
 
Under Georgeann's sustainability leadership, Dallas College has transitioned to renewable energy, undertaken its first ever Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education ("AASHE") Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) report and is working to develop its first ever college-wide Resilience and Climate Action Plan.  Her primary goal is for students to graduate from Dallas College with a “Sustainable Solutions” mindset.  When solving any challenge in their lives, she encourages them to ask these three questions:

Is the solution:
  • Good for people?
  • Good for the planet?
  • Good for our prosperity?
If the answer to any of those questions is "No", then they know they need to continue working until they can answer every one of them with a resounding "Yes!"


Modernizing the Future of Energy: Optimize Smart Grid Performance Protection and Profitability

 

I’m a member of IEEE, and this appeared through the online IEEE Spectrum magazine site in an email. But I think that anyone can attend — all they seem to want is your “business email” and address and other info so they can get you on their mailing list. This topic sounded interesting to me. Note that someone from the Power Sector IoT group at Intel will be speaking. I assume that Crystal Group is a software and systems engineering company for the energy industry. 
https://engineeringresources.spectrum.ieee.org/free/w_defa1834/

Wednesday, 10 November 2021, 2pm ET

 

Transforming 55,000+ substations into independent micro data centers addresses the most pressing distribution, security and cost challenges plaguing the U.S. power grid. Learn how virtualization delivers a holistic solution to modernize and expand the Grid with the capacity, protection and reliability needed to keep power flowing smoothly.

Speakers:

  • Brian Rinehart, Manager, Systems Engineering, Crystal Group
  • Chad Hutchinson, Director, Product Development, Crystal Group
  • Mike Flender, Technical Director, Crystal Group
  • Prithpal Khajuria, Global Segment Leader, Power Sector IoT Group, Intel

 

 


Offered Free by: Crystal Group 

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